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what dinosaur has 0 teeth Tag

What dinosaur has 500 teeth?

What dinosaur has 500 teeth?

Pronounced: as “NYE-jer-SORE-us”. If you’ve landed on this page to discover what dinosaur has 500 teeth, then you’re in the right place. Nigersauraus, has unfortunately been turned into an internet joke in recent times, due to it’s name, which is pronounced “NYE-jer-SORE-us” and the rather unusual fact that this dinosaur had over 500 teeth. How did Nigersaurus get its name? The dunes of the Sahara Desert gave rise to a new and bizarre dinosaur. An elephant-sized creature with a skull and jaws, but unlike anything scientists have ever seen. That Dinosaur would go on to be called Nigersuarus. It was given the nickname the “Mesozoic Cow”, as many paleontologists believe their behaviour was similar to that of modern cows. Nigersaurus, pronounced as “NYE-jer-SORE-us” and derived from “Niger” (the nation where it was discovered) and the Greek “sauros” meaning lizard (making it “Niger’s lizard” or “Niger reptile”), was one of the oldest sauropodomorph herbivore dinosaurs ever discovered. It’s a Diplodocus-like sauropod dinosaur genus. Nigersauraus had a relatively short neck and had an astonishing 500 teeth in it’s wide jaws, giving it very distinguished characteristics when compared to other dinosaurs. Quick Nigersaurus Facts NAME NIGERSAURUS First Found: Niger, Africa by Philippe Taquet When it lived: Cretaceous epoch, 100.5 – 110 million years ago Weight: 4 Tonnes Length & Height Up to 10m in length Diet: Soft plants, grasses, water plants and shoots   When did Nigersaurus live? Nigersaurus lived during the Cretaceous epoch and roamed Africa’s terrestrial areas. Its fossils have been discovered in countries like Niger, Africa, and it lived between the Aptian Age and about 100.5 -110 million years ago. This period spans the Aptian to the Albian periods and even the Cenomanian. The African plains and woods were the dinosaur’s natural home. Nigersaurus tended to reside in places with adjacent water lakes or streams, known as the riparian zone. A riparian zone features a lot of low-lying vegetation due to the abundance of water. Nigersaurus was the only sauropod species that grazed, and experts believe it may have done almost continuously. What did Nigersaurus eat? With its shovel-shaped mouth, which contained over 500 teeth, it was perfectly equipped for eating large amounts of vegetation as it walked along. It is believed that Nigersaurus head would have almost been constantly at the ground, possibly devouring as much as a football field’s worth of vegetation in a single day. Many paleontologists believe that Nigersaurus 500 teeth arrangement served much like a comb as well. Nigersaurus may have filtered and eaten water plants using a comb-like process to stop it from eating mud and dirt. However, some scientists believe it simply used its teeth to cut vegetation and then sucked it in using a vacuum-like motion due to the fragility of its jawbones. Unfortunately, as the environment changed, various flora replaced the specialized grasses to which it had grown specifically adapted. Nigersaurus failed to adapt to its surroundings and eventually went extinct. Where was Nigersaurus discovered? Nigersaurs was discovered in the Elrhaz Formation in Gadoufaoua, Republic of Niger, among the rich fossil vertebrate fauna. Nigersaurus taqueti is the only species in the genus, named after the French palaeontologist Philippe Taquet, who discovered the first bones in a 1965–1972 expedition to Niger. Fossils of Nigersaurus were also discovered and described in 1976, but it...